Strategy first. Social ROI will follow

Back in February of this year, research highlighted that 74% of CMOs predicted 2011 to finally be the year that social media efforts could be tied to a quantifiable return on investment (ROI). Yet, as we’re nearing the end of 2011, how social media marketing can be measured remains an often unanswered question.

We often have clients approach us with tainted views of social media marketing, with the opinion that it is immeasurable, that it cannot drive quantified sales leads and thus is a waste of their time.

However, more often than not what we eventually find is that their experience with social marketing has been nothing less than experiential, and lacked the solid foundations needed for the marketing campaign to succeed.

Social marketing pitfalls

The most important thing to do prior to implementing any marketing campaign is to first define your goal. Having a clear business objective is key to delivering a campaign that provides a measurable return on your investment.

Once the business objective is clear, consider how social media marketing can support this goal. Measuring the effectiveness is actually the easy part! One of the benefits of social media being digital is that, through the correct use of website analytics you can track back online sales to find what originally led the consumer through to the site in the first place.

Social media marketing is measurable and quantifiable – and both myself and the team at Receptional can help you realise just how social marketing can help meet those objectives of yours. But you absolutely must have a business goal in mind before you jump in.

Employee productivity and your social media policy

(Blog post originally published at Receptional.com)

The words “Social Media” bring to mind disaster and lazy employees to many a CEOs mind, and often justifiably so. According to a survey from harmon.ie, 53% of employees are wasting at least one hour a day on distractions at work such as social media, text messaging and other applications.

Not only are there huge losses in productivity, but also there is the associated risk of the employee endangering the brand or company itself – hence why many organisations are resorting to banning access to Facebook and Twitter entirely in the workplace. Because of which, social networks have been given a bad name in the board room – unjustifiably so.

Social networks present brands and organisations with a whole new way to interact with customers, and a fresh and constant view of their marketplace. Not to mention that all the “Generation-Y” employees entering the marketplace now are using technology and interacting with each other in very different ways, and numerous studies have shown that breaks in the working day can help improve productivity.

The solution is simple:

Organisations need to have a social media policy in place to govern how employees use social networks in the workplace

Our consultants at Receptional have a wealth of experience developing social media policies for organisations such as PR agencies, right through to global technology companies – both in cases where social media marketing activities need to be focused and productive, as well as where employees need to have their time spent tagging their Facebook photos kept to a reasonable amount!

We can also help with tailored guides for how to utilise social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to gain the most out of them for your industry.

Give us a call, or email me (bjordan@receptional.com) if you want to know more about how we can help your business and employees become more productive.